A lesson from Sweden

We do not suggest that the UK should switch from driving on the left to driving on the right, but we ask if there are lessons from Sweden’s switch in 1967 that might be applied to the oft-postponed changeover of UK’s road traffic signs to metric.

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Olympics – metric in Winter too

The Department for Transport has always maintained that the measurement system used on road traffic signs can be considered in isolation from the UK, European and global economies. The Winter Olympics in Korea, now drawing to a close, provide us with yet another reminder, should one be needed, that this might not be so.

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An insight into recent thinking at the DfT

We look at some internal correspondence at the UK Department for Transport (DfT) on the subject of the avoiding the obligation to fix a date for the conversion of road traffic signs to metric measurements.

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Minor success for UKMA – imperial-only height and width signs to be discontinued

The Department for Transport (DfT) has announced a tiny but significant piece of progress on the long road to completing metrication in the UK.
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Government decision contradicts road safety initiatives

The Government has been accused of failing to implement the strategies necessary to achieve goals agreed as part of two major international road safety initiatives. Furthermore, its decision on width and height restriction sign regulations, made shortly after taking office in 2010, directly contradicts one of the aims stated by the UN Decade of Action for Road Safety.

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DfT misses another trick

The Department for Transport wants to reduce sign clutter.  Very commendable, you might think.  So why don’t they adopt an obvious measure that would make many signs smaller, simpler and easier to read – and thereby reduce clutter? Continue reading “DfT misses another trick”

DfT admits: no basis for blocking metric signs

After finally admitting they were wrong to try to withhold this information, the DfT have now published their analysis of the responses to their earlier consultation on the proposed phasing out of imperial-only height and width restriction traffic signs.
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